Tag Archives: Mick Jagger

Bob Dylan art: to buy or not to buy?

The launch of three signed limited edition prints from Bob Dylan The Brazil Series will be tempting some readers of ROCK ART EDITIONS to consider becoming owners of Bob Dylan art for the first time.

To buy or not to buy?

If you’re one of those who thinks carefully before parting with £1,000+, here’s a list of questions you might ask yourself before deciding.

Bob Dylan art: Boxing Gym 2015

Boxing Gym, Bob Dylan The Brazil Series © Bob Dylan/Castle Galleries 2015

First, you need to decide why you’d buy a limited edition print by Bob Dylan – are you an art lover, a Dylan fan/collector, or an investor?

Bob Dylan art for lovers of paintings

Would you be buying Bob Dylan art because you love paintings?

If so, you might ask yourself a supplementary question: why buy Bob Dylan art when you could buy a limited edition print by, say, Chagall, Miro or even Picasso for a similar price? Or when you could buy a couple of dozen high quality reproductions of masterpieces of Western art for under £1,000?

Bob Dylan art for fans/collectors

Would you be buying Bob Dylan art because you’re a fan or collector of all things Dylan?

If yes, would you rather buy a limited edition print of a Bob Dylan painting than, say, a rare pressing of the Freewheelin’ LP, or a mint copy from the original print run of one of the famous posters, or a limited edition photograph by, say, Daniel Kramer or Elliott Landy, or a first edition copy of Bob Dylan Writings And Drawings?

If you’d be buying a print simply to obtain Bob Dylan’s autograph, you’d certainly be saving yourself a lot of fruitless effort. Securing Dylan’s autograph by presenting him in person with a pen and piece of paper is well-nigh impossible. Dylan’s security cordon is commendably tight: you’d never get near enough to ask for his autograph.

But Dylan’s autograph is no longer rare – it’s circulating on many thousands of limited edition prints. Is £1,000+ a competitive price for a Dylan signature?

Bob Dylan art

Man On A Bridge, Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series © Bob Dylan 2008

Which piece of Bob Dylan art would you buy? Fans/collectors can now choose from a wide selection. Bob Dylan art targeted at Everyman first became available in 2008, with several images in The Drawn Blank Series. Publishers Castle Galleries/Halcyon/Washington Green have added a new range of images from the same series every year since.

And now they’re also offering the first three prints from The Brazil Series – Ranchers, Boxing Gym and Favela Villa Broncos. More images from the Brazil Series will surely come. They’re all very different from the publisher’s Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank series.

Bob Dylan art for investors

You want to buy Bob Dylan art for investment? You read reports that Christie’s, New York just set a new auction record, selling Les Femmes d’Alger by Picasso for a gravity-defying $179m. So investing in art is a no-brainer, right?

Wrong!

If I was considering buying Bob Dylan art for investment, I’d ask myself a number of hard questions, including:

* which pieces of Bob Dylan art, from which of his ten series, should I buy?
* what return would I hope to make? Over what period?
* is there an after-market for limited edition prints by Bob Dylan?
* how, exactly, would I sell a piece or a portfolio of Bob Dylan art?
* how “limited” is a limited edition on offer?
* how likely is it that more versions of an image will be released?
* how much more Bob Dylan art will be offered for sale?
* will new releases dilute the value of my holding?
* rather than buying relatively low value Bob Dylan limited editions, should I buy Bob Dylan originals (at considerably higher prices) instead?
* are other types of Bob Dylan collectable more saleable?
* do other examples of rock art – eg Mick Jagger portraits by canonical artists like Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton – have a better investment potential?
* would I be better off investing in limited edition prints by more celebrated 20thC artists – Matisse, Leger, Miro et al?
* how many pieces of Bob Dylan art would I need to make up a worthwhile investment portfolio?
* would I be better off investing in other, more conventional asset classes – property, shares, savings account… ?
* would I get more satisfaction from a holiday in California or the French Riviera, or from buying that new carbon fibre road bike I’ve been lusting after… ?

Mick Jagger by And Warhol

Mick Jagger 1975 © Andy Warhol 1975

Bob Dylan art: to buy or not to buy?

These are some of the many questions that a novice buyer of Bob Dylan art might consider. You’ll have other questions – please share them with readers of ROCK ART EDITIONS by posting a comment via the Leave a Reply button at the top of this post.

In the end, of course, it’s a personal choice. Only you can decide whether or not you should buy Bob Dylan art. And whether that art should be a signed limited edition print from the new Bob Dylan The Brazil Series.

Your call. Good luck!

Details of the three new prints from Bob Dylan The Brazil Series: Castle Galleries.

Copyright: images as indicated; text © Gerald Smith, ROCK ART EDITIONS 2015. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

Mick Jagger portraits: a guide for beginners

Mick Jagger portraits are everywhere.

Visit any major art gallery with a contemporary collection and Mick Jagger will probably be there to greet you. Spend ten minutes in a high street gallery dealing in art for your walls, and you’re likely to come across the Rolling Stones singer.

Mick Jagger portraits vary, both in quality and price. Here are four examples of paintings and mixed media artwork I’d consider if building an ideal rock art collection. You can see the first two pieces in national galleries in London, the other two in selected high street outlets.

Mick Jagger portraits #1: Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol’s Mick Jagger portraits are the pick of the crop.

Why? Because they are intrinsically attractive. And because they have the art world’s official seal of approval – I shot the photograph below in the prestigious National Portrait Gallery, London.

Mick Jagger portrait by Andy Warhol

Mick Jagger portrait, National Portrait Gallery, London © Andy Warhol

Like all artwork by Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger prints are reassuringly expensive – auctioned by leading houses like Christie’s and Sotheby’s, they achieve prices of tens of thousands of pounds.

You need to do your homework, though – there are many variant limited edition prints of images from the same Andy Warhol project.

Mick Jagger portraits #2: Richard Hamilton – Swingeing London

Richard Hamilton, the leading English exponent of Pop Art, is the other top artist with Mick Jagger portraits in his portfolio.

Swingeing London, an iconic image based on a press photograph of Mick Jagger in handcuffs, was reproduced in a series of mixed media limited edition prints.

Mick Jagger, poster boy for Richard Hamilton exhibition, Tate Modern, London, 2013

Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton. © Tate Modern, London 2014

I’ve seen variants of Swingeing London in leading London galleries such as Tate Britain, as well as smaller spaces like the Serpentine Gallery, Christie’s Mayfair and Alan Cristea.

My photograph shows the poster for the recent Richard Hamilton blockbuster exhibition at Tate Modern, London.  The inspirational exhibition has since been shown at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid.

Mick Jagger portraits by Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton are fundamental building blocks of any representative collection of rock art. I’ll be profiling them in more detail here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: you can ensure you don’t miss them by subscribing to receive new posts by email (subscription sign-up at top right of this page).

If Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton prints are beyond your budget, though, you can pick from a wide range of Mick Jagger portraits at more affordable prices. Here are two examples which caught my eye recently.

Mick Jagger portraits #3: Kate Gibb – Electric Mick – Two

Kate Gibb’s Electric Mick – Two is a striking piece. On a leisurely summer outing to Brighton, as I passed Art Republic (13 Bond St, Brighton), it almost sucked me in off the street!

Mick Jagger portrait, Electric Mick 2, by Kate Gibb

Electric Mick -Two © Kate Gibb 2014

The image here is of a signed (by the artist) silkscreen limited edition of 50. It was priced at £1100 in the shop. You can buy it online from Art Republic – directly and via Amazon.

Electric Mick also comes in several other editions, using different colours.  Electric Mick – One is presented in a blue palette, for example.  And in different sizes.

Mick Jagger portraits #4: Louis Sidoli

And Mick Jagger portraits just keep on coming. The most recent example is this giclee on paper limited edition (of 495) by Louis Sidoli (£399), which I saw last week at Castle Galleries, St Christopher Place, London W1.

Mick Jagger portrait by Louis Sidoli, Castle Galleries, London

Mick Jagger © Louis Sidolio

Any collector of Mick Jagger portraits faces an embarrassment of riches. And apart from a host of paintings and mixed media artworks like those featured here, you have to consider photographs.

Mick Jagger has few equals in attracting the camera lens, so there are probably more extant photographs of him than of any other rock musician.

I’ll be profiling the most collectable Mick Jagger photographs here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: if you have any suggestions, please email me and I’ll include them.

© ROCK | ART | EDITIONS 2014

Rock Art in October: David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan…

Davis Bowie from Aladdin Sane shoot

David Bowie Is exhibition catalogue © The David Bowie Archive

October sees some major rock art shows, with David Bowie, Mick Jagger and Bob Dylan among the featured musicians.

Here are some of the exhibitions I’d like to attend.

DAVID BOWIE: David Bowie Is, originally held at London’s V&A, has just opened at The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the only US venue on its world tour. The exhibition showcases 400+ objects, mainly from the David Bowie Archive, including handwritten lyrics, photographs, and album cover artwork, as well as costumes and sets. Admission $25, $10 children 7–12, free for the under-6s. 23 Sept-4 Jan 2015. Supported by a desirable catalogue ($35 paperback/$55 hardback).

MICK JAGGER by Richard Hamilton: Richard Hamilton’s magnificent retrospective, featuring mixed media tableaux of a handcuffed Mick Jagger, and originally shown at Tate Modern in London, has now opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. To 13 October. Highly recommended.

BOB DYLAN by Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon People – Perth, Western Australia exhibition of 80 photographs by Richard Avedon, including an evocative shot of Bob Dylan on a cold February 1965 day in Central Park. Art Gallery of WA, Perth, Australia. To 17 Nov.

KEITH RICHARDS, LOU REED, AMY WINEHOUSE in Paris: Sonic is a new exhibition of portraits of musicians by Hedi Slimane, photographer and Yves Saint Laurent designer, at Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent, in Paris. It showcases shots of Lou Reed, Keith Richards, Amy Winehouse and Brian Wilson taken in London, New York, and California. 18 Sept-11 Jan 2015. Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent

PETER BLAKE: A new permanent mural, Appearing at the Royal Albert Hall, on display near the Cafe Bar, Royal Albert Hall, London. Free. Gathers 400+ performers who have appeared since the Hall opened. Notable rock musicians include Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, The Rolling Stones, and The Who.

 

You are strongly advised to check details with a venue’s website before travelling – some shows require advance booking and details can change, often at short notice.

Have you seen any of these shows? What did you think of it? Your comments are very welcome. Have I missed an important show?

Visitors and galleries: please tell us of any show we have missed, for inclusion in next month’s round-up. Please send comments/details of shows to ROCK | ART | EDITIONS via “Leave a reply” at the top of this post.

Compilation © ROCK | ART | EDITIONS 2014

Rock Art: what to see in August 2014

There’s a wealth of rock art on show around the world this August. Here are some of the more enticing exhibitions.

JIMMY PAGE by his daughter: Resonators: Guitar heroes, Jimmy Page to Johnny Marr by photographer Scarlet Page (daughter of Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin). Images for sale, proceeds to the Teenage Cancer Trust. ArtHouse Crouch End, London N8. To 6 August. Free.

RONNIE WOOD of the ROLLING STONES: Ronnie Wood: Art and Music, William Benton Museum of Art in Storrs, University of Connecticut, USA. To 10 August. Free.

Mick Jagger cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine, by Richard Bernstein

Mick Jagger – Interview. © Richard Bernstein

MICK JAGGER by Richard Bernstein: Richard Bernstein Interview Cover Art, portraits of 1970s and 1980s celebs, including Mick Jagger, for the cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine. Fashion Illustration Gallery at The Mayor Gallery, 22A Cork St., London W1. To 23 Aug.

BOB DYLAN: photographs by Daniel Kramer, Paulucci Space Theatre, Hibbing Community College, Hibbing MN, USA. To 23 August. Free.

TERRY O’NEILL: The Rolling Stones plus other 1960s musicians/celebs on view at Terry O’Neill: The Man Who Shot the Sixties, Izzy Gallery, Yorkville Avenue, Toronto, Canada. To 24 August.

GREAT BLACK MUSIC: Michael Jackson, Cesaria Evora, Marvin Gaye, Billie Holiday, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Aretha Franklin, Bob Marley, Myriam Makeba, Oum Kalsoum, among many others. La Cité de la Musique, in NE Paris, France. To 24 August.

PATTI SMITH: Celebrating local resilience after Hurricane Sandy, “Rockaway!“, is a series of installations around Fort Tilden. Includes Patti Smith’s Resilience of the Dreamer, a gold and white bed inside an abandoned locomotive repair building. To 1 September.

BOB DYLAN by Douglas R. Gilbert: Forever Young: Photographs of Bob Dylan by Douglas R. Gilbert, 30+ photos from 1964. South Haven Center for the Arts, 600 Phoenix St., South Haven MI, USA. To 7 Sept. Free.

AMERICAN COOL: 100 “cool Americans”, including musicians Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Miles Davis and Jay-Z, film actors like Lauren Bacall, and writers such as Ernest Hemingway. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington DC, USA. To 7 September. Free.

MICK JAGGER by Richard Hamilton: Richard Hamilton’s magnificent retrospective, featuring mixed media tableaux of a handcuffed Mick Jagger, and originally shown at Tate Modern in London, has now opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. To 13 October. Highly recommended.

BOB DYLAN by Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon People – Perth, Western Australia exhibition of 80 photographs by Richard Avedon, including an evocative shot of Bob Dylan on a cold February 1965 day in Central Park. Art Gallery of WA, Perth, Australia. 2 August-17 Nov

PETER BLAKE: A new permanent mural, Appearing at the Royal Albert Hall, on display near the Cafe Bar, Royal Albert Hall, London. Free. Gathers 400+ performers who have appeared since the Hall opened. Notable rock musicians include Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, The Rolling Stones, and The Who.

Peter Blake will be best known to many readers of ROCK | ART | EDITIONS for his celebrated artwork on the cover of the Beatles album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

(You are strongly advised to check details with a venue’s website before travelling – some shows require advance booking and details can change, often at short notice)

Have you seen any of these shows? What did you think of it? Your comments are very welcome. Have I missed an important show?

Visitors and galleries: please tell us of any show we have missed, for inclusion in next month’s round-up. Please send comments/details of shows to ROCK | ART | EDITIONS via “Leave a reply” at the top of this post.

Compilation © ROCK | ART | EDITIONS Ltd 2014

The Rolling Stones in Paris: the Stones love France #2

The Rolling Stones in Paris this Friday promises to be one of the highlights of the 2014 tour.

Why? Because the Rolling Stones love France: lots of images suggest that the Stones, particularly Mick Jagger, have enjoyed a richly rewarding 50-year relationship with la Belle France.

Their most productive visit to France, in 1971, delivered Exile on Main St, one of the top Rolling Stones LPs, with its distinctive album cover.

Here are a four more illustrations of the French connections of the Rolling Stones (with apologies for the poor sizing – I’m in a rush to make Eurostar to Paris first thing on Friday morning):

#1 Mick Jagger with Francoise Hardy, 1967

The Rolling Stones in Paris

Mick Jagger with Francoise Hardy, © Jean-Marie Perier 1967

Francoise Hardy was the leading French pop singer in mid-’60s Paris, with hit singles like Tous les Garcons et les Filles. Mick Jagger was clearly a fan…

#2 Sympathy For The Devil, 1968

One + One by Jean-Luc Godard

Sympathy For The Devil, © Cupid Productions Ltd 1968

Sympathy For The Devil (aka One + One), a film directed by Jean-Luc Godard, the best-known French director of the period, has extensive footage of the Rolling Stones recording their classic song, Sympathy For The Devil.

(The DVD pictured is a freebie promo copy distributed with the English newspaper The Sunday Times.)

#3 The Rolling Stones in Paris studios

The Rolling Stones in Paris studios

Studio Guillaume Tell, Suresnes, near Paris

The Rolling Stones have occasionally recorded in Paris, most recently in 2012 at Studio Guillaume Tell in Suresnes, where they recorded One More Shot, and Doom and Gloom, for the GRRR! compilation.

Mick Jagger is thought to have laid down his vocals for Tattoo You in a studio on an industrial estate somewhere on the Peripherique.

And the rehearsals for the current tour included a set in a studio in Bondy on 14 February 2014. Other recent tour rehearsals featured a flash gig on the the Avenue des Champs-Elysees.

#4 Mick Jagger, le gentilhomme francais

Chateau Mick Jagger

Mick Jagger house, Loire valley

Mick Jagger is probably the most francophile Rolling Stone. He’s owned an impressive chateau near Amboise, in la Touraine in the Loire valley, since 1980. And he’s a fluent French speaker, as you’d expect from such an intelligent man.

Yes, the Rolling Stones certainly give the impression that they love France.

Rolling Stones photos: top 5 books for the 50th anniversary

Aficionados of Rolling Stones photos are in luck!  The 50th anniversary in 2012 generated some very collectable photography books.

Here are my top 5:

Rolling Stones photos #1 Rolling Stones 50

Rolling Stones photos: the official book

The Rolling Stones 50, 2012

The official coffee table book has the richest content; it’s certainly the biggest. Unmissable.

Rolling Stones photos #2 The Rolling Stones Fifty Years exhibition catalogue

Rolling Stones photos

Rolling Stones 50th Exhibition

The catalogue of the official Rolling Stones exhibition, which I saw in Somerset House, London, features all of the lovely photographs on display at the show. Much slimmer than #1, above.

Rolling Stones photos #3 Rolling Stones – 50 x 20

Rolling Stones photos

Rolling Stones 50 x 20, Insight Editions

My favourite unofficial collection: the 20 in the title refers to the photographers whose work is presented, chapter by chapter. Includes photography by Michael Joseph – the front cover is from his inspired Beggars Banquet shoot – Gered Mankowitz and Barry Feinstein.

Rolling Stones photos #4 The Rolling Stones Photobiographie 1962-2012

Rolling Stones photos

Rolling Stones Photobiographie 1962-2012, Fetjaine

The Rolling Stones Photobiographie 1962-2012 (Getty Images; text, in French, by Francois Plassat, published by Fetjaine) is well worth checking out…

Rolling Stones photos #5 Chronique

Rolling Stones photos

Chronique des Rolling Stones, Chronique Editions

… as is a second French collection, Chronique des Rolling Stones, text by Philippe Margotin (published by Chronique Editions).

If you have a favourite book from the many other compilations of Rolling Stones photographs celebrating the 50th anniversary, please share it with fellow ROCK | ART | EDITIONS readers – please Leave a reply (at the top of the page).

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #6-7

The Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton is one of the best-known in rock art.

It’s currently highly visible on posters in London as Tate Modern promotes its Richard Hamilton retrospective exhibition.

Swingeing London, showing Mick Jagger handcuffed to a prison guard in the back of a van, is also occasionally used on book covers, employed as a metaphor for “Pop Art” or the “Swinging Sixties”.

Such books are essential collectables for many a serious Rolling Stones aficionado. Here are two examples from my collection.

Mick Jagger in Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

The First Pop Age, 2012

Pop Art by Hal Foster is an art historical study of the work of Richard Hamilton and contemporary pop art giants Warhol, Lichtenstein, Richter and Ruscha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Fraser with Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

Groovy Bob, 1999

Groovy Bob is a biography of art dealer and Swinging London scenester Robert Fraser. It’s a highly regarded study of a period of rapid cultural change, as some in England started to throw off the shackles imposed by Victorian society.

Together with the five desirable artefacts covered in my two posts last week, these two books make up my 7 essential Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton collectables.

 

 

 

If you can expand my list, please share your expertise with fellow Rolling Stones art collectors by clicking Leave a reply at the top of the post.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables – #3-5

In Tuesday’s post, I introduced the first two of my favourite 7 essential collectables of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, namely the poster and postcard box from the current Hamilton retrospective exhibition at Tate Modern, London.

Here are my selections #3-5.

Promo pamphlet and catalogue of Richard Hamilton exhibition, 2010

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton in Swingeing London

Promo for Modern Moral Matters

The Rolling Stones singer is the subject of 13 illustrations in the Modern Moral Matters exhibition catalogue. Apart from the cover image, the promo pamphlet has nothing on Hamilton’s Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton T-shirt

Mick Jagger Rolling Stones T-shirt

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

The T-shirt, from the National Portrait Gallery, London, reproduces a slightly different version of the Richard Hamilton artwork, viz Swingeing London 67(a). The owner of this shirt clearly values it too highly to actually wear it – it hasn’t left the bag.

Swingeing London monograph

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Richard Hamilton Swingeing London 67(f)

This is the most detailed art historical study of Richard Hamilton’s iconic Mick Jagger artwork, Swingeing London.

Next week I’ll be sharing my essential collectables #6-7. I’d welcome hearing about your favourite Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton images.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #1-2

Rock art aficionados partial to images of The Rolling Stones have been queuing up at Tate Modern, London to see the current Richard Hamilton exhibition.

They’ve been paying particular attention to the wall full of different versions of Swingeing London, the iconic Mick Jagger artwork based on a newspaper photograph of the Rolling Stones singer being ferried between custody and court in 1967.

I covered the show here on ROCK ART EDITIONS – please scroll to the bottom of the blog to read the preview and review.

If you haven’t seen the Richard Hamilton exhibition yet, you’ll need to hurry: this outstanding retrospective closes on 26 May.

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton was released both as original artwork and limited editions, in various versions. All now command the premium prices you’d expect of work by one of the key figures in Pop Art.

The celebrated Mick Jagger in handcuffs image crops up occasionally on less pricey artefacts, which interest collectors from all budget brackets. I’m reviewing seven of my favourites in this and the next two posts.

Collectors interested in my first two choices, the merchandise of the current Tate Modern exhibition – the poster and a postcard box – are advised to buy quickly. They are must-haves for any serious collector of Rolling Stones images.

Richard Hamilton – Exhibition poster

Swingeing London, Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London

Richard Hamilton – 15 Postcards box

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton, featuring Mick Jagger

Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards, Tate Publishing, London, 2014. Cover based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

The box contains a Swingeing London postcard, plus 14 non-Jagger cards.

I’ll be revealing more Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton essential collectables – #3-5 and #6-7 – in my next two posts. If you possess – or know of – other favourite versions of the iconic Swingeing London image, please share them by Leaving a reply (link at the top of this post).

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Rolling Stones photographs: exhibition of little-seen collection in Paris

Rolling Stones in the '70s exhibition

Rolling Stones – Angie (c) Dominic Lamblin 2014, on sale at Galérie Blumann, Paris.

A new exhibition, The Rolling Stones in the ’70s, offers Stones art collectors a rare chance to enjoy little-seen work by French photographer Dominic Lamblin.

The Rolling Stones in the ’70s is now showing in Paris at la Galérie Blumann, 4 Place des Vosges, at the epicentre of the exquisite Marais district, a kilometre or so east of the Louvre.

You can see The Rolling Stones in the ’70s seven days a week until 5 May, 12h-19h.

www.galerieblumann.com

The Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band in the World’s lifelong love affair with Paris shows no signs of cooling: the Rolling Stones play le Stade de France on 13 June.

And they’ve spent a lot of time in Paris/Ile de France in the last few years. In August 2012 they chose Studio Guillaume-Tell in Suresnes, just west of the Bois de Boulogne, to cut Doom and Gloom and One Last Shot, the two new songs recorded for the GRRR! compilation.

The Rolling Stones also rehearsed in Paris for their 2013 and 2014 tours, delighting assiduous hardcore fans with tiny try-out gigs in and around the city.

Paris returns their love, of course: Rolling Stones product is almost as visible in the City of Light as it is in London.

On my last cultural rummage, I spotted a giant print of the iconic Terry O’Neill photograph of Mick Jagger on the cover of Rolling Stones 50th Anniversary, a very large format limited edition book of photographs, published by Original Editions:

Mick Jagger (c) Terry O'Neill 2013, cover of Rolling Stones 50th Anniversary, Original Editions, 2013

Mick Jagger (c) Terry O’Neill 2013, cover of Rolling Stones 50th Anniversary, Original Editions, 2013

www.originaleditions.fr