Tag Archives: Paul McCartney

Ringo Starr Photograph: new book has rare and unseen Beatles photos

Ringo Starr Photograph, the new book by the former Beatles drummer, presents Ringo’s Beatles photos alongside shots of other phases of his life and times. The “rare and unseen” photographs are enhanced by a commentary by Ringo. The mass market edition of Ringo Starr Photograph follows an earlier signed limited edition, both from Genesis Publications.

Beatles photos are not difficult to come by – the Fab Four number among the most photographed individuals in the history of the world. But Beatles photos shot by a Beatle are pretty rare. Hence the interest from fans and collectors.

Ringo Starr photos

Ringo Starr Photograph © Genesis Publications 2015

Ringo Starr Photograph was launched at London’s prestigious National Portrait Gallery. A couple of weeks ago, the gallery and Genesis were still selling 10 different framed prints of Beatles photos taken from the book. All 10 are published in a limited edition of 25 copies, signed by Ringo Starr. The framed prints cost £1965 each, delivered.

Ringo books before Ringo Starr Photograph

Ringo Starr Photograph isn’t the musician’s first contribution to Beatles art: his two earlier books interest fans and collectors, though neither carries his photos of the band.

Beatles photos

Ringo Starr, Postcards From The Boys © Cassell 2004

Postcards From The Boys was published as a mass market book (Cassell, 2004) after first appearing as a signed, limited edition by Genesis Publications. Postcards From The Boys consists of the facsimiles of 50+ postcards sent to Ringo Starr by John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison over 30 years, from the band’s 1960s heyday. Both Lennon and McCartney decorate their postcards with quick sketches: Beatles art for Everyman.

And Ringo Starr lyrics from the Beatles song Octopus’s Garden were worked into a children’s book of the same name (2013/2015), with charming illustrations by Ben Cort.

Beatles art by Lennon, McCartney (and Harrison)

Collectors of Beatles art realised long ago that the Fab Four had individual creative talents well away from the recording studio and the concert stage.

John Lennon drawings and paintings, the best-known category of Beatles art, can be seen in several collections, starting with his witty mid-1960s books, In His Own Write and A Spaniard in the Works. John Lennon: The Collected Artwork, edited by Scott Gutterman (Insight Editions, 2015), brings the story bang up to date.

Macca’s engaging canvases are collected in Paul McCartney Paintings (Little, Brown, 2000). And George Harrison entered the fray with I Me Mine, a book of curated images, also published in two editions, like Ringo Starr Photograph, by Genesis.

ROCK ART EDITIONS will be exploring Beatles art – Beatles photos, John Lennon art, Paul McCartney paintings and the books of Ringo Starr and George Harrison – in depth. So fans and collectors should keep checking in!

Bob Dylan art: Face Value portrait “contemptible” – Brian Sewell, top English critic

ROCK ART EDITIONS published an earlier version of this post in October 2014. It’s republished here to commemorate Brian Sewell, art critic of the London Evening Standard. He’s the best-known English critic, particularly among those who share his rejection of much contemporary art. Brian Sewell died last weekend, aged 84.

Bob Dylan art gets the thumbs down: his Skip Sharpe portrait is “Contemptible.  Just rubbish”.  It should not have been exhibited by the National Portrait Gallery, according to top critic Brian Sewell, in his Pop Goes The Easel, a scathing survey of rock musicians who paint.

Q magazine published Sewell’s damning piece in November 2013, to coincide with the Bob Dylan Face Value show at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Bob Dylan art: Face Value

Skip Sharpe by Bob Dylan, Face Value exhibition 2013. © Bob Dylan 2013

Bob Dylan art “just rubbish”, Macca paintings “childish rubbish”

The critic goes on to lambast other rock-musicians-turned-painters. He dismisses artwork by Beatles bassist Paul McCartney as “childish rubbish”. Edwyn Collins’ artwork shows promise… when judged as the work of a 14-year old! Daniel Johnston’s Captain America is “… just awful.  Utter, utter rubbish”.

Funny, that.  I enjoyed the Bob Dylan art in the Face Value exhibition, a small gallery of distinctive portraits, held in 2013. The portraits are representative Bob Dylan art – they successfully capture Dylan’s penetrating, sceptical, questioning worldview. My only criticism was that the show didn’t have enough pictures.

Bob Dylan art: judge for yourself – catalogue still available

You can judge for yourself the Bob Dylan art dismissed by Sewell. Bob Dylan Face Value, a handsome, collectable catalogue, published by the National Portrait Gallery, London, is still widely available.

Bob Dylan art: Face Value catalogue

Bob Dylan Face Value catalogue © National Portrait Gallery 2013

I was also impressed by Paul McCartney: Paintings, the 1999 and 2000 catalogues of the Beatle’s artwork: I’m not keen on Macca’s music, but I do like his painting.

Brian Sewell is a celebrated London-based art critic known for his lively journalism and entertaining TV appearances. He tends not to, er, sit on the fence.

The dismissive tone in his Q article was echoed in the recent assessment of some rocker-painters by Guardian critic Jonathan Jones, covered here last week. (Bob Dylan got off lightly.)

I’m collecting critical commentaries – positive and negative – on Bob Dylan art and work by other rock musicians who paint, to discuss on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS.  If you come across any critiques, please Leave a reply, at the top of this article.  Thanks, in advance.

 

Copyright: images © Bob Dylan and © National Portrait Gallery, London, as indicated in captions.  Brian Sewell quotations © Q magazine.  Text © Gerald Smith, ROCK ART EDITIONS 2015.  Unauthorised reproduction prohibited. 

Bob Dylan art “contemptible”, Paul McCartney’s “childish” – Q magazine on rockers who paint

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan art: Skip Sharpe, Face Value exhibition 2013. © Bob Dylan 2013

Bob Dylan art On The Face Of It: Skip Sharpe is “Contemptible.  Just rubbish”.  The portrait should not have been exhibited by the National Portrait Gallery, according to critic Brian Sewell, in his Pop Goes The Easel, a scathing survey of rock musicians who paint.

Sewell’s damning piece was published in Q magazine, November 2013, to coincide with the Face Value show of Bob Dylan art at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

The critic goes on to lambast other rock-musicians-turned-painters. Artwork by Beatles bassist Paul McCartney is dismissed as “childish rubbish”. Edwyn Collins’ artwork shows promise… when judged as the work of a 14-year old! Daniel Johnston’s Captain America is “… just awful.  Utter, utter rubbish”.

Funny, that.  I like Bob Dylan art. I enjoyed the Bob Dylan Face Value exhibition, a small gallery of distinctive portraits. They successfully capture Dylan’s penetrating, sceptical, questioning worldview. My only criticism was that the show didn’t have enough Bo Dylan art.

Bob Dylan Face Value portrait, Skip Sharpe

Bob Dylan Face Value catalogue © National Portrait Gallery 2013

You can judge Face Value for yourself – the handsome, collectable catalogue, published by the National Portrait Gallery, London, is still widely available. I was also impressed by Paul McCartney: Paintings, the 1999 and 2000 catalogues of the Beatle’s artwork: I’m not keen on Macca’s music, but I do like his painting.

Brian Sewell is a celebrated London-based art critic known for his lively journalism and entertaining TV appearances. He tends not to, er, sit on the fence.

The dismissive tone in his Q article was echoed in the recent assessment of some rocker-painters by Guardian critic Jonathan Jones, covered here last week. (Bob Dylan art got off lightly.)

I’m collecting critical commentaries – positive and negative – on rock musicians who paint, to discuss on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS.  If you come across any critiques, please email me.