Tag Archives: Richard Hamilton

Bob Dylan art: worth collecting? A good investment? The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014

Bob Dylan art

Woman in Red Lion Pub, Man On A Bridge, Train Tracks: stars of Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014

Is Bob Dylan art worth collecting?

Yes.  To be precise, some Bob Dylan art is worth collecting.

Is Bob Dylan art also a good investment?  Yes, it can be – but you need to know exactly what you’re buying.

Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014

You get a fair idea which Bob Dylan art is worth collecting and/or a good investment at Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014, an impressive – and revealing – retrospective exhibition running at Castle Fine Art, 24 Bruton Street, London W1 until 29 November.  It’s well worth a journey – you can spend a couple of enjoyable hours there.

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan art, Drawn Blank Series 2008-14, London W1

Bob Dylan art: worth collecting?

Not all Drawn Blank prints were created equal. Bob Dylan paintings first appeared at an exhibition at Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz in 2007-2008. Chemnitz is a small city west of Dresden – a fairly remote place in the former DDR, hence an ideal venue for Bob Dylan to test the waters with his painting.

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series, Chemnitz exhibition catalogue

The 92 sketches in Drawn Blank, Dylan’s 1994 book, were transformed into 322 different gouache and watercolour images, from which the 170 works exhibited at Chemnitz were selected.

A few of these paintings were also used for Washington Green’s first (2008) release of limited edition prints, but most of the publisher’s images appear to be slightly different gouache and water colour tableaux developed from the 1994 drawings.

How many of the 300 or so works in The Drawn Blank Series you’d want to see on your wall is a subjective matter.  There’s a few dozen pieces that I’d be happy to hang alongside those of more critically acclaimed artists featured in ROCK ART EDITIONS, such as Richard Hamilton, Andy Warhol and Peter Blake.

I’d consider buying about another third of the prints. But I struggle to enthuse over the rest of the works in Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series.

As I argued in a recent post on ROCK ART EDITIONS, I find The Drawn Blank Series 2014 to be a mixed bag. I love three of the eight images released, including a new colour version of Woman In Red Lion Pub, a familiar favourite. The other five? They don’t do it for me.

Bob Dylan art: a good investment?

In addition to judging Bob Dylan art as a collector, potential investors will also assess the work for its potential future growth in value.

Let’s start by considering three star performers in the current Castle Fine Art exhibition. If, on release in 2008, you’d bought Medium (36″ x 28″) versions of Man On A Bridge, Woman in Red Lion Pub and Train Tracks (photograph above), at £1,995 each (unframed), you would already be looking at a substantial capital gain: they are valued in this exhibition at £12,850, £12,850 and £15,350 respectively – a total of over £41,000, for an outlay of under £6,000.

But remember – that’s the value of these three limited editions from the 2008 release in the Medium size. Other releases and sizes of the same images haven’t performed as well. For example, the Standard (ie smaller, 27.5″ x 22″) Man On A Bridge and Woman in Red Lion Pub from the 2011 release are priced at £3,750, with the 2012 Man release at £2,750.

And remember – these prices are quoted by a gallery allied to the publisher of The Drawn Blank Series, a gallery trying to sell the whole collection. So these exhibition prices should be regarded as indicative, rather than definitive.  Establishing a more accurate open market value for these three prints would require an analysis of pricing and sales data from independent dealers, eBay and, notably, the major auction houses.

This trio of images – Man On A Bridge, Woman in Red Lion Pub and Train Tracks – are, arguably, the pick of the Drawn Blank crop. They are very desirable artefacts to own and hang on your wall, but you need to carefully consider their investment potential.

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan Drawn Blank Series: three Portfolios, 2008

The Portfolios – in this case, packages of different versions of the same image – are probably not as good investments as the individual prints.  For example, the Standard sized 2008 Portfolio of four versions of Train Tracks 2008 is now priced at £28,500, while the 2008 Portfolio of four Man On A Bridge prints is on sale here for £13,500, almost the same price as the Medium 2008 individual graphic.

Bob Dylan limited editions – how limited?

How limited is a Bob Dylan limited edition print?

Take the wonderful Man On a Bridge as an example, again. The original 2008 Medium print – the one which has soared in value – was produced in a limited edition of 295 – a very acceptable limit to the edition.

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan, Man On A Bridge 2008

But those 295 aren’t the end of the story. The image has also been released in different colours, different sizes, different packages and different media between 2008 and 2014.

Only 295 of Medium size Man On a Bridge prints (the high value one) were released in 2008. But count the copies released in the different versions, add those sold in sets and complete collections, not to mention Artist’s Prints and Printer’s Prints, and you begin to realise that “limited edition” is an elastic concept.

A quick calculation indicates that there are over 3,000 officially released copies of Man On A Bridge in the wild right now. And who knows how many more releases the piece will see?

You could, of course, argue that an aggregate edition of a few thousand is no barrier to purchasing a Bob Dylan artefact as an investment. After all, the recent Bob Dylan The Lyrics Since 1962 was released in a limited edition of 3,000. That seemed to me like an unnecessarily small edition, probably a commercial miscalculation by publishers Simon and Schuster, and I ordered my copy without a second thought.

Despite a relentless programme of annual releases since 2008, only a proportion of the images shown at Chemnitz or, indeed, catalogued by Washington Green in their handsome 2008 monograph, have been released so far. Many owners will be hoping that the weaker prints offered for sale in 2014 might indicate that the well is running dry.

Artist and publisher are, of course, within their rights to keep releasing new Drawn Blank Series artwork for as long as there is unsatisfied demand from collectors and investors.

Bob Dylan art: original Drawn Blank Series paintings

In addition to the limited edition prints, within the reach of most potential buyers, many of the original paintings (from which the limited editions were printed) were put on sale from 2008.

You’d expect them to be mostly sold. Many are reportedly valued in the low hundreds of thousands of pounds. An acrylic Man On A Bridge, wearing a fetching brown-grey coat, on display at the Castle Fine Art exhibition, has a six-figure price tag.

And whether the 300+ originals prepared for Chemnitz have been – or will be – sold is unknown. They could double the number of original, high value Drawn Blank artworks in circulation.

Do your research, get safeguards

If you are tempted to buy a piece of Bob Dylan art from this series, your first step might be to work out exactly why you want to buy it: would you be buying as a fan? A collector? Or an investor?

Whatever your motive, you need to do some homework: information is available to help you reduce risk – in exhibition and sales catalogues, as well as online resources.

Once you’ve decided to buy a piece, you need to check that it’s genuine. You’ll insist on a certificate of authenticity, and reliable information on the artwork’s provenance. You’re obviously safest with an established outlet in the Castle Galleries chain, or one of the independent UK galleries supplied with stock by publishers Washington Green.

But, beyond these outlets, it’s a good bet that there will be fake Dylan prints doing the rounds already: thieves abound on the fringes of the art world and the Dylan Universe. They target mugs who don’t know what they’re buying.

Caveat emptor!

Bob Dylan art: how good is it?

To summarise: some Bob Dylan art from The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014 is probably a good investment. But do your homework before you buy.

If you’re buying a print from Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series purely for pleasure, you’ll have a piece of Bob Dylan hanging on your wall, complete with signature – even if it drops in value.

And make no mistake: the Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014 exhibition underlines Bob Dylan’s credentials as an artist to be taken seriously.  His portraits and cityscapes are particularly engaging.  Like Dylan songs, the paintings are clearly the work of an acute observer.  Many of these pictures reinforce Dylan’s standing as a non-pareil poet of the everyday, one who detects multiple meanings in the mundane.

Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014 reveals a body of work with a singular vision, expressed in a unique style.  To my mind, the best work in this collection positions Bob Dylan alongside the German Expressionists.

Am I biased?  Certainly: Bob Dylan and visual art are two of my central life interests. To see them combined, as in the best work in Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2018-2014, leaves me truly smitten.

Seven years ago, there was very little Bob Dylan art around – the drawings in the 1994 book, earlier sketches in Writings and Drawings and its mid-1980s update, and a modicum of album cover artwork. The world now seems awash with Dylan artwork.

Bob Dylan art

Bob Dylan, Drawn Blank, Random House, 1994

For this, collectors and investors are indebted to Ingrid Mossinger of Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz, who realised that the sketches in Drawn Blank (1994) could be transformed into an impressive, extensive collection of paintings.

And to publishers Washington Green who saw the commercial opportunity presented at the Chemnitz exhibition, and made Bob Dylan art accessible to most citizens of the developed world.

Washington Green have an excellent online catalogue of Bob Dylan The Drawn Blank Series 2008-2014.

All images © Bob Dylan/Washington Green 2014, except Chemnitz catalogue © Prestel 2007, and Drawn Blank © Random House 1994.

Disclaimer: if you are considering buying art from The Drawn Blank Series, please see the disclaimer on the About ROCK ART EDITIONS page.

Mick Jagger portraits: a guide for beginners

Mick Jagger portraits are everywhere.

Visit any major art gallery with a contemporary collection and Mick Jagger will probably be there to greet you. Spend ten minutes in a high street gallery dealing in art for your walls, and you’re likely to come across the Rolling Stones singer.

Mick Jagger portraits vary, both in quality and price. Here are four examples of paintings and mixed media artwork I’d consider if building an ideal rock art collection. You can see the first two pieces in national galleries in London, the other two in selected high street outlets.

Mick Jagger portraits #1: Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol’s Mick Jagger portraits are the pick of the crop.

Why? Because they are intrinsically attractive. And because they have the art world’s official seal of approval – I shot the photograph below in the prestigious National Portrait Gallery, London.

Mick Jagger portrait by Andy Warhol

Mick Jagger portrait, National Portrait Gallery, London © Andy Warhol

Like all artwork by Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger prints are reassuringly expensive – auctioned by leading houses like Christie’s and Sotheby’s, they achieve prices of tens of thousands of pounds.

You need to do your homework, though – there are many variant limited edition prints of images from the same Andy Warhol project.

Mick Jagger portraits #2: Richard Hamilton – Swingeing London

Richard Hamilton, the leading English exponent of Pop Art, is the other top artist with Mick Jagger portraits in his portfolio.

Swingeing London, an iconic image based on a press photograph of Mick Jagger in handcuffs, was reproduced in a series of mixed media limited edition prints.

Mick Jagger, poster boy for Richard Hamilton exhibition, Tate Modern, London, 2013

Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton. © Tate Modern, London 2014

I’ve seen variants of Swingeing London in leading London galleries such as Tate Britain, as well as smaller spaces like the Serpentine Gallery, Christie’s Mayfair and Alan Cristea.

My photograph shows the poster for the recent Richard Hamilton blockbuster exhibition at Tate Modern, London.  The inspirational exhibition has since been shown at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid.

Mick Jagger portraits by Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton are fundamental building blocks of any representative collection of rock art. I’ll be profiling them in more detail here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: you can ensure you don’t miss them by subscribing to receive new posts by email (subscription sign-up at top right of this page).

If Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton prints are beyond your budget, though, you can pick from a wide range of Mick Jagger portraits at more affordable prices. Here are two examples which caught my eye recently.

Mick Jagger portraits #3: Kate Gibb – Electric Mick – Two

Kate Gibb’s Electric Mick – Two is a striking piece. On a leisurely summer outing to Brighton, as I passed Art Republic (13 Bond St, Brighton), it almost sucked me in off the street!

Mick Jagger portrait, Electric Mick 2, by Kate Gibb

Electric Mick -Two © Kate Gibb 2014

The image here is of a signed (by the artist) silkscreen limited edition of 50. It was priced at £1100 in the shop. You can buy it online from Art Republic – directly and via Amazon.

Electric Mick also comes in several other editions, using different colours.  Electric Mick – One is presented in a blue palette, for example.  And in different sizes.

Mick Jagger portraits #4: Louis Sidoli

And Mick Jagger portraits just keep on coming. The most recent example is this giclee on paper limited edition (of 495) by Louis Sidoli (£399), which I saw last week at Castle Galleries, St Christopher Place, London W1.

Mick Jagger portrait by Louis Sidoli, Castle Galleries, London

Mick Jagger © Louis Sidolio

Any collector of Mick Jagger portraits faces an embarrassment of riches. And apart from a host of paintings and mixed media artworks like those featured here, you have to consider photographs.

Mick Jagger has few equals in attracting the camera lens, so there are probably more extant photographs of him than of any other rock musician.

I’ll be profiling the most collectable Mick Jagger photographs here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: if you have any suggestions, please email me and I’ll include them.

© ROCK | ART | EDITIONS 2014

Rock Art in October: David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan…

Davis Bowie from Aladdin Sane shoot

David Bowie Is exhibition catalogue © The David Bowie Archive

October sees some major rock art shows, with David Bowie, Mick Jagger and Bob Dylan among the featured musicians.

Here are some of the exhibitions I’d like to attend.

DAVID BOWIE: David Bowie Is, originally held at London’s V&A, has just opened at The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the only US venue on its world tour. The exhibition showcases 400+ objects, mainly from the David Bowie Archive, including handwritten lyrics, photographs, and album cover artwork, as well as costumes and sets. Admission $25, $10 children 7–12, free for the under-6s. 23 Sept-4 Jan 2015. Supported by a desirable catalogue ($35 paperback/$55 hardback).

MICK JAGGER by Richard Hamilton: Richard Hamilton’s magnificent retrospective, featuring mixed media tableaux of a handcuffed Mick Jagger, and originally shown at Tate Modern in London, has now opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. To 13 October. Highly recommended.

BOB DYLAN by Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon People – Perth, Western Australia exhibition of 80 photographs by Richard Avedon, including an evocative shot of Bob Dylan on a cold February 1965 day in Central Park. Art Gallery of WA, Perth, Australia. To 17 Nov.

KEITH RICHARDS, LOU REED, AMY WINEHOUSE in Paris: Sonic is a new exhibition of portraits of musicians by Hedi Slimane, photographer and Yves Saint Laurent designer, at Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent, in Paris. It showcases shots of Lou Reed, Keith Richards, Amy Winehouse and Brian Wilson taken in London, New York, and California. 18 Sept-11 Jan 2015. Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent

PETER BLAKE: A new permanent mural, Appearing at the Royal Albert Hall, on display near the Cafe Bar, Royal Albert Hall, London. Free. Gathers 400+ performers who have appeared since the Hall opened. Notable rock musicians include Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, The Rolling Stones, and The Who.

 

You are strongly advised to check details with a venue’s website before travelling – some shows require advance booking and details can change, often at short notice.

Have you seen any of these shows? What did you think of it? Your comments are very welcome. Have I missed an important show?

Visitors and galleries: please tell us of any show we have missed, for inclusion in next month’s round-up. Please send comments/details of shows to ROCK | ART | EDITIONS via “Leave a reply” at the top of this post.

Compilation © ROCK | ART | EDITIONS 2014

Rock Art exhibitions: what to see in September

Beatles White Album exhibition in Liverpool

We Buy White Albums © R Chang/FACT, Liverpool 2014

There’s a wealth of rock art exhibitions around the world this September. Here are some of the exhibitions ROCK | ART | EDITIONS would be attending if it were possible.

BOB DYLAN by Douglas R. Gilbert: Forever Young: Photographs of Bob Dylan by Douglas R. Gilbert, 30+ photos from 1964. South Haven Center for the Arts, 600 Phoenix St., South Haven MI, USA. To 7 Sept. Free.

AMERICAN COOL: 100 “cool Americans”, including musicians Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Miles Davis and Jay-Z, film actors like Lauren Bacall, and writers such as Ernest Hemingway. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington DC, USA. To 7 September. Free.

THE BEATLES – multiple White Album covers in Liverpool: Rutherford Chang is at FACT in Liverpool to exhibit and add to his enormous collection of copies of The Beatles’ White Album, designed by leading English Pop artist Richard Hamilton. The We Buy White Albums exhibition is set up like a record shop with multiple copies of the single product; and Chang is buying, not selling! FACT and Liverpool International Music Festival, We Buy White Albums, FACT loading bay, Wood Street, Liverpool until 14 September. FACT, Liverpool

MICK JAGGER by Richard Hamilton: Richard Hamilton’s magnificent retrospective, featuring mixed media tableaux of a handcuffed Mick Jagger, and originally shown at Tate Modern in London, has now opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. To 13 October. Highly recommended.

BOB DYLAN by Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon People – Perth, Western Australia exhibition of 80 photographs by Richard Avedon, including an evocative shot of Bob Dylan on a cold February 1965 day in Central Park. Art Gallery of WA, Perth, Australia. To 17 Nov.

KEITH RICHARDS, LOU REED, AMY WINEHOUSE in Paris: Sonic is a new exhibition of portraits of musicians by Hedi Slimane, photographer and Yves Saint Laurent designer, at Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent, in Paris. It showcases shots of Lou Reed, Keith Richards, Amy Winehouse and Brian Wilson taken in London, New York, and California. 18 Sept-11 Jan 2015. Fondation Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent

PETER BLAKE: A new permanent mural, Appearing at the Royal Albert Hall, on display near the Cafe Bar, Royal Albert Hall, London. Free. Gathers 400+ performers who have appeared since the Hall opened. Notable rock musicians include Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, The Rolling Stones, and The Who.

 

You are strongly advised to check details with a venue’s website before travelling – some shows require advance booking and details can change, often at short notice.

Have you seen any of these shows? What did you think of it? Your comments are very welcome. Have I missed an important show?

Visitors and galleries: please tell us of any show we have missed, for inclusion in next month’s round-up. Please send comments/details of shows to ROCK | ART | EDITIONS via “Leave a reply” at the top of this post.

Compilation © ROCK | ART | EDITIONS Ltd 2014

Rock Art: what to see in August 2014

There’s a wealth of rock art on show around the world this August. Here are some of the more enticing exhibitions.

JIMMY PAGE by his daughter: Resonators: Guitar heroes, Jimmy Page to Johnny Marr by photographer Scarlet Page (daughter of Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin). Images for sale, proceeds to the Teenage Cancer Trust. ArtHouse Crouch End, London N8. To 6 August. Free.

RONNIE WOOD of the ROLLING STONES: Ronnie Wood: Art and Music, William Benton Museum of Art in Storrs, University of Connecticut, USA. To 10 August. Free.

Mick Jagger cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine, by Richard Bernstein

Mick Jagger – Interview. © Richard Bernstein

MICK JAGGER by Richard Bernstein: Richard Bernstein Interview Cover Art, portraits of 1970s and 1980s celebs, including Mick Jagger, for the cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine. Fashion Illustration Gallery at The Mayor Gallery, 22A Cork St., London W1. To 23 Aug.

BOB DYLAN: photographs by Daniel Kramer, Paulucci Space Theatre, Hibbing Community College, Hibbing MN, USA. To 23 August. Free.

TERRY O’NEILL: The Rolling Stones plus other 1960s musicians/celebs on view at Terry O’Neill: The Man Who Shot the Sixties, Izzy Gallery, Yorkville Avenue, Toronto, Canada. To 24 August.

GREAT BLACK MUSIC: Michael Jackson, Cesaria Evora, Marvin Gaye, Billie Holiday, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Aretha Franklin, Bob Marley, Myriam Makeba, Oum Kalsoum, among many others. La Cité de la Musique, in NE Paris, France. To 24 August.

PATTI SMITH: Celebrating local resilience after Hurricane Sandy, “Rockaway!“, is a series of installations around Fort Tilden. Includes Patti Smith’s Resilience of the Dreamer, a gold and white bed inside an abandoned locomotive repair building. To 1 September.

BOB DYLAN by Douglas R. Gilbert: Forever Young: Photographs of Bob Dylan by Douglas R. Gilbert, 30+ photos from 1964. South Haven Center for the Arts, 600 Phoenix St., South Haven MI, USA. To 7 Sept. Free.

AMERICAN COOL: 100 “cool Americans”, including musicians Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Miles Davis and Jay-Z, film actors like Lauren Bacall, and writers such as Ernest Hemingway. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington DC, USA. To 7 September. Free.

MICK JAGGER by Richard Hamilton: Richard Hamilton’s magnificent retrospective, featuring mixed media tableaux of a handcuffed Mick Jagger, and originally shown at Tate Modern in London, has now opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain. To 13 October. Highly recommended.

BOB DYLAN by Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon People – Perth, Western Australia exhibition of 80 photographs by Richard Avedon, including an evocative shot of Bob Dylan on a cold February 1965 day in Central Park. Art Gallery of WA, Perth, Australia. 2 August-17 Nov

PETER BLAKE: A new permanent mural, Appearing at the Royal Albert Hall, on display near the Cafe Bar, Royal Albert Hall, London. Free. Gathers 400+ performers who have appeared since the Hall opened. Notable rock musicians include Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, The Rolling Stones, and The Who.

Peter Blake will be best known to many readers of ROCK | ART | EDITIONS for his celebrated artwork on the cover of the Beatles album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

(You are strongly advised to check details with a venue’s website before travelling – some shows require advance booking and details can change, often at short notice)

Have you seen any of these shows? What did you think of it? Your comments are very welcome. Have I missed an important show?

Visitors and galleries: please tell us of any show we have missed, for inclusion in next month’s round-up. Please send comments/details of shows to ROCK | ART | EDITIONS via “Leave a reply” at the top of this post.

Compilation © ROCK | ART | EDITIONS Ltd 2014

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #6-7

The Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton is one of the best-known in rock art.

It’s currently highly visible on posters in London as Tate Modern promotes its Richard Hamilton retrospective exhibition.

Swingeing London, showing Mick Jagger handcuffed to a prison guard in the back of a van, is also occasionally used on book covers, employed as a metaphor for “Pop Art” or the “Swinging Sixties”.

Such books are essential collectables for many a serious Rolling Stones aficionado. Here are two examples from my collection.

Mick Jagger in Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

The First Pop Age, 2012

Pop Art by Hal Foster is an art historical study of the work of Richard Hamilton and contemporary pop art giants Warhol, Lichtenstein, Richter and Ruscha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Fraser with Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

Groovy Bob, 1999

Groovy Bob is a biography of art dealer and Swinging London scenester Robert Fraser. It’s a highly regarded study of a period of rapid cultural change, as some in England started to throw off the shackles imposed by Victorian society.

Together with the five desirable artefacts covered in my two posts last week, these two books make up my 7 essential Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton collectables.

 

 

 

If you can expand my list, please share your expertise with fellow Rolling Stones art collectors by clicking Leave a reply at the top of the post.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables – #3-5

In Tuesday’s post, I introduced the first two of my favourite 7 essential collectables of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, namely the poster and postcard box from the current Hamilton retrospective exhibition at Tate Modern, London.

Here are my selections #3-5.

Promo pamphlet and catalogue of Richard Hamilton exhibition, 2010

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton in Swingeing London

Promo for Modern Moral Matters

The Rolling Stones singer is the subject of 13 illustrations in the Modern Moral Matters exhibition catalogue. Apart from the cover image, the promo pamphlet has nothing on Hamilton’s Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton T-shirt

Mick Jagger Rolling Stones T-shirt

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

The T-shirt, from the National Portrait Gallery, London, reproduces a slightly different version of the Richard Hamilton artwork, viz Swingeing London 67(a). The owner of this shirt clearly values it too highly to actually wear it – it hasn’t left the bag.

Swingeing London monograph

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Richard Hamilton Swingeing London 67(f)

This is the most detailed art historical study of Richard Hamilton’s iconic Mick Jagger artwork, Swingeing London.

Next week I’ll be sharing my essential collectables #6-7. I’d welcome hearing about your favourite Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton images.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #1-2

Rock art aficionados partial to images of The Rolling Stones have been queuing up at Tate Modern, London to see the current Richard Hamilton exhibition.

They’ve been paying particular attention to the wall full of different versions of Swingeing London, the iconic Mick Jagger artwork based on a newspaper photograph of the Rolling Stones singer being ferried between custody and court in 1967.

I covered the show here on ROCK ART EDITIONS – please scroll to the bottom of the blog to read the preview and review.

If you haven’t seen the Richard Hamilton exhibition yet, you’ll need to hurry: this outstanding retrospective closes on 26 May.

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton was released both as original artwork and limited editions, in various versions. All now command the premium prices you’d expect of work by one of the key figures in Pop Art.

The celebrated Mick Jagger in handcuffs image crops up occasionally on less pricey artefacts, which interest collectors from all budget brackets. I’m reviewing seven of my favourites in this and the next two posts.

Collectors interested in my first two choices, the merchandise of the current Tate Modern exhibition – the poster and a postcard box – are advised to buy quickly. They are must-haves for any serious collector of Rolling Stones images.

Richard Hamilton – Exhibition poster

Swingeing London, Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London

Richard Hamilton – 15 Postcards box

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton, featuring Mick Jagger

Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards, Tate Publishing, London, 2014. Cover based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

The box contains a Swingeing London postcard, plus 14 non-Jagger cards.

I’ll be revealing more Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton essential collectables – #3-5 and #6-7 – in my next two posts. If you possess – or know of – other favourite versions of the iconic Swingeing London image, please share them by Leaving a reply (link at the top of this post).

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger prints in free exhibition

Rolling Stones images - Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea Gallery 1

Release by Richard Hamilton 1972. © The estate of Richard Hamilton 2014. On display at Alan Cristea Gallery, London

Connoisseurs of Rolling Stones images not completely sated by Tate Modern’s luminous Richard Hamilton exhibition are heading to London’s Mayfair to see a second Hamilton show.

Richard Hamilton: Word and Image, Prints 1963-2007 is showing at Alan Cristea Gallery, 31/34 Cork St, London W1 until 22 March.  It has some delightful Rolling Stones images (aka artworks starring Mick Jagger).

It’s a splendid small exhibition with over sixty Hamilton prints, including two from the iconic Swingeing London: a screenprint version of the familiar image, entitled Release and published in 1972 in a limited edition of 150, and Swingeing London 67 – etching, published as an edition of 70 in 1968.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea 2

Swingeing London 67 – etching by Richard Hamilton. © The estate of Richard Hamilton 2014. On display at Alan Cristea Gallery, London

The Alan Cristea exhibition repeats many of the Hamilton images on view at Tate Modern, but it’s smaller, being restricted to prints on paper. And it’s free.

Like the Richard Hamilton show at Tate Modern, it’s a delight, and is highly recommended.

The catalogue (£25) is a must-have for followers of this important artist and for collectors of Rolling Stones images.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea 3

Richard Hamilton: Word and Image, Prints 1963-2012, Alan Ctistea Gallery, London, 2014.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger at Tate Modern – three desirable collectables

MJposter1
Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

The Richard Hamilton exhibition at Tate Modern is a wonderful retrospective of the life’s work of one of the founders of Pop Art.

But what does it offer for collectors of Rolling Stones images – assuming that most readers couldn’t afford to buy an original from the Swingeing London series, featuring a handcuffed Mick Jagger?

Commendably, Tate Modern caters for collectors of Rolling Stones images on a budget with three very desirable products featuring the Swingeing London image.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #1: poster

The exhibition poster offers the collector a chance to display the iconic image in his/her own home. It costs a mere £6.99, unframed. Framed, it would embellish the living space of even the most discerning collector of Rolling Stones images. I’d guess the poster might sell out quickly.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #2: set of postcards

Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards binds together key pieces from the exhibition, including Swingeing London, which is also the cover image. It’s another bargain, at a mere £7.50.

MJpostcardbook
Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards, Tate Publishing, London, 2014. Cover based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #3: catalogue

Collectors of Rolling Stones images inspired by Swingeing London and keen to explore Richard Hamilton’s work should also consider buying the exhibition catalogue.

It’s an elegant door-stopper of a book, housed in a tough paperback binding. Its images of the Swingeing London exhibits are presented in the context of Hamilton’s wider legacy. At £29.99, it’s very good value.

MJcataloguespread
Pages from the exhibition catalogue of Richard Hamilton, Tate Publishing, 2014, (c) Tate, London 2014. Images of Swingeing London 67, 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Exhibited at Tate, London, 2014.

Diligent amassers of Rolling Stones images, especially those who can’t make the London exhibition, will want to buy this trio of impressive artefacts.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton