Tag Archives: Swingeing London

Mick Jagger portraits: a guide for beginners

Mick Jagger portraits are everywhere.

Visit any major art gallery with a contemporary collection and Mick Jagger will probably be there to greet you. Spend ten minutes in a high street gallery dealing in art for your walls, and you’re likely to come across the Rolling Stones singer.

Mick Jagger portraits vary, both in quality and price. Here are four examples of paintings and mixed media artwork I’d consider if building an ideal rock art collection. You can see the first two pieces in national galleries in London, the other two in selected high street outlets.

Mick Jagger portraits #1: Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol’s Mick Jagger portraits are the pick of the crop.

Why? Because they are intrinsically attractive. And because they have the art world’s official seal of approval – I shot the photograph below in the prestigious National Portrait Gallery, London.

Mick Jagger portrait by Andy Warhol

Mick Jagger portrait, National Portrait Gallery, London © Andy Warhol

Like all artwork by Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger prints are reassuringly expensive – auctioned by leading houses like Christie’s and Sotheby’s, they achieve prices of tens of thousands of pounds.

You need to do your homework, though – there are many variant limited edition prints of images from the same Andy Warhol project.

Mick Jagger portraits #2: Richard Hamilton – Swingeing London

Richard Hamilton, the leading English exponent of Pop Art, is the other top artist with Mick Jagger portraits in his portfolio.

Swingeing London, an iconic image based on a press photograph of Mick Jagger in handcuffs, was reproduced in a series of mixed media limited edition prints.

Mick Jagger, poster boy for Richard Hamilton exhibition, Tate Modern, London, 2013

Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton. © Tate Modern, London 2014

I’ve seen variants of Swingeing London in leading London galleries such as Tate Britain, as well as smaller spaces like the Serpentine Gallery, Christie’s Mayfair and Alan Cristea.

My photograph shows the poster for the recent Richard Hamilton blockbuster exhibition at Tate Modern, London.  The inspirational exhibition has since been shown at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid.

Mick Jagger portraits by Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton are fundamental building blocks of any representative collection of rock art. I’ll be profiling them in more detail here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: you can ensure you don’t miss them by subscribing to receive new posts by email (subscription sign-up at top right of this page).

If Andy Warhol and Richard Hamilton prints are beyond your budget, though, you can pick from a wide range of Mick Jagger portraits at more affordable prices. Here are two examples which caught my eye recently.

Mick Jagger portraits #3: Kate Gibb – Electric Mick – Two

Kate Gibb’s Electric Mick – Two is a striking piece. On a leisurely summer outing to Brighton, as I passed Art Republic (13 Bond St, Brighton), it almost sucked me in off the street!

Mick Jagger portrait, Electric Mick 2, by Kate Gibb

Electric Mick -Two © Kate Gibb 2014

The image here is of a signed (by the artist) silkscreen limited edition of 50. It was priced at £1100 in the shop. You can buy it online from Art Republic – directly and via Amazon.

Electric Mick also comes in several other editions, using different colours.  Electric Mick – One is presented in a blue palette, for example.  And in different sizes.

Mick Jagger portraits #4: Louis Sidoli

And Mick Jagger portraits just keep on coming. The most recent example is this giclee on paper limited edition (of 495) by Louis Sidoli (£399), which I saw last week at Castle Galleries, St Christopher Place, London W1.

Mick Jagger portrait by Louis Sidoli, Castle Galleries, London

Mick Jagger © Louis Sidolio

Any collector of Mick Jagger portraits faces an embarrassment of riches. And apart from a host of paintings and mixed media artworks like those featured here, you have to consider photographs.

Mick Jagger has few equals in attracting the camera lens, so there are probably more extant photographs of him than of any other rock musician.

I’ll be profiling the most collectable Mick Jagger photographs here on ROCK | ART | EDITIONS: if you have any suggestions, please email me and I’ll include them.

© ROCK | ART | EDITIONS 2014

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #6-7

The Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton is one of the best-known in rock art.

It’s currently highly visible on posters in London as Tate Modern promotes its Richard Hamilton retrospective exhibition.

Swingeing London, showing Mick Jagger handcuffed to a prison guard in the back of a van, is also occasionally used on book covers, employed as a metaphor for “Pop Art” or the “Swinging Sixties”.

Such books are essential collectables for many a serious Rolling Stones aficionado. Here are two examples from my collection.

Mick Jagger in Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

The First Pop Age, 2012

Pop Art by Hal Foster is an art historical study of the work of Richard Hamilton and contemporary pop art giants Warhol, Lichtenstein, Richter and Ruscha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Fraser with Mick Jagger, from Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

Groovy Bob, 1999

Groovy Bob is a biography of art dealer and Swinging London scenester Robert Fraser. It’s a highly regarded study of a period of rapid cultural change, as some in England started to throw off the shackles imposed by Victorian society.

Together with the five desirable artefacts covered in my two posts last week, these two books make up my 7 essential Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton collectables.

 

 

 

If you can expand my list, please share your expertise with fellow Rolling Stones art collectors by clicking Leave a reply at the top of the post.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables – #3-5

In Tuesday’s post, I introduced the first two of my favourite 7 essential collectables of Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, namely the poster and postcard box from the current Hamilton retrospective exhibition at Tate Modern, London.

Here are my selections #3-5.

Promo pamphlet and catalogue of Richard Hamilton exhibition, 2010

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton in Swingeing London

Promo for Modern Moral Matters

The Rolling Stones singer is the subject of 13 illustrations in the Modern Moral Matters exhibition catalogue. Apart from the cover image, the promo pamphlet has nothing on Hamilton’s Swingeing London image of Mick Jagger.

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton T-shirt

Mick Jagger Rolling Stones T-shirt

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

The T-shirt, from the National Portrait Gallery, London, reproduces a slightly different version of the Richard Hamilton artwork, viz Swingeing London 67(a). The owner of this shirt clearly values it too highly to actually wear it – it hasn’t left the bag.

Swingeing London monograph

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Richard Hamilton Swingeing London 67(f)

This is the most detailed art historical study of Richard Hamilton’s iconic Mick Jagger artwork, Swingeing London.

Next week I’ll be sharing my essential collectables #6-7. I’d welcome hearing about your favourite Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton images.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton: 7 essential collectables, #1-2

Rock art aficionados partial to images of The Rolling Stones have been queuing up at Tate Modern, London to see the current Richard Hamilton exhibition.

They’ve been paying particular attention to the wall full of different versions of Swingeing London, the iconic Mick Jagger artwork based on a newspaper photograph of the Rolling Stones singer being ferried between custody and court in 1967.

I covered the show here on ROCK ART EDITIONS – please scroll to the bottom of the blog to read the preview and review.

If you haven’t seen the Richard Hamilton exhibition yet, you’ll need to hurry: this outstanding retrospective closes on 26 May.

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton was released both as original artwork and limited editions, in various versions. All now command the premium prices you’d expect of work by one of the key figures in Pop Art.

The celebrated Mick Jagger in handcuffs image crops up occasionally on less pricey artefacts, which interest collectors from all budget brackets. I’m reviewing seven of my favourites in this and the next two posts.

Collectors interested in my first two choices, the merchandise of the current Tate Modern exhibition – the poster and a postcard box – are advised to buy quickly. They are must-haves for any serious collector of Rolling Stones images.

Richard Hamilton – Exhibition poster

Swingeing London, Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London

Richard Hamilton – 15 Postcards box

Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton, featuring Mick Jagger

Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards, Tate Publishing, London, 2014. Cover based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

The box contains a Swingeing London postcard, plus 14 non-Jagger cards.

I’ll be revealing more Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton essential collectables – #3-5 and #6-7 – in my next two posts. If you possess – or know of – other favourite versions of the iconic Swingeing London image, please share them by Leaving a reply (link at the top of this post).

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger prints in free exhibition

Rolling Stones images - Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea Gallery 1

Release by Richard Hamilton 1972. © The estate of Richard Hamilton 2014. On display at Alan Cristea Gallery, London

Connoisseurs of Rolling Stones images not completely sated by Tate Modern’s luminous Richard Hamilton exhibition are heading to London’s Mayfair to see a second Hamilton show.

Richard Hamilton: Word and Image, Prints 1963-2007 is showing at Alan Cristea Gallery, 31/34 Cork St, London W1 until 22 March.  It has some delightful Rolling Stones images (aka artworks starring Mick Jagger).

It’s a splendid small exhibition with over sixty Hamilton prints, including two from the iconic Swingeing London: a screenprint version of the familiar image, entitled Release and published in 1972 in a limited edition of 150, and Swingeing London 67 – etching, published as an edition of 70 in 1968.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea 2

Swingeing London 67 – etching by Richard Hamilton. © The estate of Richard Hamilton 2014. On display at Alan Cristea Gallery, London

The Alan Cristea exhibition repeats many of the Hamilton images on view at Tate Modern, but it’s smaller, being restricted to prints on paper. And it’s free.

Like the Richard Hamilton show at Tate Modern, it’s a delight, and is highly recommended.

The catalogue (£25) is a must-have for followers of this important artist and for collectors of Rolling Stones images.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton, Alan Cristea 3

Richard Hamilton: Word and Image, Prints 1963-2012, Alan Ctistea Gallery, London, 2014.

Rolling Stones images: Mick Jagger at Tate Modern – three desirable collectables

MJposter1
Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

The Richard Hamilton exhibition at Tate Modern is a wonderful retrospective of the life’s work of one of the founders of Pop Art.

But what does it offer for collectors of Rolling Stones images – assuming that most readers couldn’t afford to buy an original from the Swingeing London series, featuring a handcuffed Mick Jagger?

Commendably, Tate Modern caters for collectors of Rolling Stones images on a budget with three very desirable products featuring the Swingeing London image.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #1: poster

The exhibition poster offers the collector a chance to display the iconic image in his/her own home. It costs a mere £6.99, unframed. Framed, it would embellish the living space of even the most discerning collector of Rolling Stones images. I’d guess the poster might sell out quickly.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #2: set of postcards

Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards binds together key pieces from the exhibition, including Swingeing London, which is also the cover image. It’s another bargain, at a mere £7.50.

MJpostcardbook
Richard Hamilton: 15 Postcards, Tate Publishing, London, 2014. Cover based on Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

Collectable Rolling Stones images #3: catalogue

Collectors of Rolling Stones images inspired by Swingeing London and keen to explore Richard Hamilton’s work should also consider buying the exhibition catalogue.

It’s an elegant door-stopper of a book, housed in a tough paperback binding. Its images of the Swingeing London exhibits are presented in the context of Hamilton’s wider legacy. At £29.99, it’s very good value.

MJcataloguespread
Pages from the exhibition catalogue of Richard Hamilton, Tate Publishing, 2014, (c) Tate, London 2014. Images of Swingeing London 67, 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. (c) The estate of Richard Hamilton, 2014. Exhibited at Tate, London, 2014.

Diligent amassers of Rolling Stones images, especially those who can’t make the London exhibition, will want to buy this trio of impressive artefacts.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Rolling Stones images dominate magnificent new Richard Hamilton exhibition

Rolling Stones images dominate the magnificent new Richard Hamilton exhibition.

In the gallery.  On the posters.  In the publicity leaflets… .

Mick Jagger just can’t help being a star.  His image covers an entire wall of the new Richard Hamilton retrospective now running at London’s Tate Modern gallery.  The six pictures of Jagger, from the Swingeing London 67 series, are highlights of a magical show.

Rolling Stones images: Swingeing London by Richard Hamilton

Poster based on Swingeing London 67 (f) 1968-69 by Richard Hamilton. © The estate of Richard Hamilton. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London.

Hanging the six Swingeing London 67 paintings – all slightly different, taken from a larger series – side-by-side along an entire wall demands that you inspect them closely.

The series is based on one of the best-known of all Rolling Stones images – a Daily Mail photograph of Mick Jagger and art dealer Robert Fraser, handcuffed in the rear of a van, being ferried between remand and the court where they were facing drugs charges.

Rolling Stones images - Tate Modern, 2014

Rolling Stones images in the street: Richard Hamilton exhibition poster

Tate Modern is wise to use Swingeing London 67 to promote the show: it’s not only one of the most familiar Rolling Stones images, it’s probably the best-known image from rock music.

Rolling Stones images - main poster for Richard Hamilton show

Rolling Stones images in the street 2: the main poster

Richard Hamilton – far more than Rolling Stones images

Richard Hamilton is, of course, about far, far more than a reworked of Rolling Stones images. His Mick Jagger wall is just one of the show’s many highlights: the exhibition’s 18 rooms are crammed full of them.

Trainsition paintings, Pin-Up, Hommage a Chrysler Corp, Protest Pictures, witty pastiches of brands such as Braun and Ricard, and scornful portraits of Labour leaders Tony Blair and Hugh Gaitskell stopped me in my tracks.

Disappointments? Well, the diminutive Just what is it… underwhelmed me, and I’m not persuaded of the merits of the Shit & Flowers series, regardless of Hamilton’s floral draughtsmanship.

The Richard Hamilton exhibition is the perfect size: extensive but easily do-able. My first, deliberate, circuit took an hour. Impressed, I retraced my steps – another half hour. After a pause for reflection, I worked through the 18 rooms for a third time. I’d struggle to spend a more deeply satisfying couple of hours.

Richard Hamilton is a great artist: Tate Modern’s exhibition, a high quality showcase of his life’s work, proves that beyond any doubt.

As you exit the last room of the show, glance to your right: you’ll be treated to several other masterpieces, mediaeval and modern:

Rolling Stones images: the view from the window of Tate Modern

Even better than looking at Rolling Stones images…

The Richard Hamilton exhibition runs until 26 May.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton

Rolling Stones images: promoting the Richard Hamilton exhibition at Tate Modern

Rolling Stones images – notably a photo of Mick Jagger – dominate the promo for the major new exhibition of the work of Richard Hamilton, one of the founders of Pop Art, now showing at London’s Tate Modern gallery.

Tate Modern is using the Rolling Stones image, Swingeing London 67 (f), Hamilton’s mixed media masterpiece – and one of the most celebrated pieces of rock art – as a key image in the poster and print campaign promoting the show.

Rolling Stones images - Mick Jagger by Richard Hamilton

Rolling Stones images in art: Swingeing London 67 (f), 1968-9, by Richard Hamilton. © The estate of Richard Hamilton 2014. Owned by and exhibited at Tate, London

Of the tens of thousands Rolling Stones images in the wild, Richard Hamilton’s Swingeing London series are among the most prized. Alongside those by Andy Warhol, they are the most highly regarded. And they carry the highest price tags.

Context of one of the most celebrated Rolling Stones images

The image shows Mick Jagger with his friend (and Hamilton’s then art dealer), Robert Fraser, handcuffed in the rear of a van ferrying them between court and custody. They were accused of drugs offences (in Jagger’s case, the unauthorised possession of amphetamines).

Adapted from a Daily Mail news photograph by John Twine, the piece dramatises the generational clash of the 1960s. The articulate Mick Jagger proved an adept critic of conservative values.

Jagger was sentenced to three months in jail, though the punishment was reduced on appeal to a conditional discharge. The Rolling Stones singer ended up spending three nights behind bars.

The six Swingeing London 67 pieces in the exhibition are part of a larger series of slightly different pieces Hamilton created, employing an extensive range of techniques – including collage, drawing, etching, screenprinting and painting with watercolour, acrylic and gouache. Some of them were published in small limited editions.

Hamilton’s conceptualisation of the Swingeing London series is strikingly original. The work is intellectually and emotionally rewarding: Swingeing London is a collection with multiple subtleties.

Richard Hamilton was a prolific artist from the 1950s to 2011. The exhibition catalogue contains “over 250 full-colour illustrations”, including iconic works such as The Citizen (IRA prison protester), Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? and Hommage a Chrysler Corp.

The Richard Hamilton exhibition, one of London’s 2014 cultural highlights, runs at Tate Modern until 26 May.

Rolling Stones images are of special interest to ROCK ART EDITIONS, and I will be reviewing the show this week. Hamilton has long been a favourite, firmly embedded in my personal canon alongside better-known names such as Rembrandt and Cezanne.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/richard-hamilton